Promac Image Systems Blog

Promac Wins Re:3D|Reddit 3D Printing Challenge!
posted by: in Uncategorized

Our company recently entered into a contest held by the 3D printing forums on Reddit.

The challenge was as follows:PictURE 2 Contestants must print something useful to their everyday lives. This could be a tool, an upgrade for a piece of furniture, a wall hook for your keys, or anything functional. The idea of this challenge is to have contestants to think about their 3D printer as a machine that can do more than make “trinkets”– it is a machine that can impact you on the human scale.

 
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Meet Promac’s New 3D Interns! Part 3

This spring, Promac welcomes 3 new interns to our 3D Printing team. As we will continue to share the different 3D projects we have been working on, we thought it would be a great idea to show who is behind these amazing prints.

Meet Yuxuan! Yuxuan is a graduate student at USC studying Computer Science. Yuxuan aspires to be a full-stack engineer and ultimately the CTO of his very own company. 

 

Q: Why are you interested in 3D Printing? Why did you want this internship? 

I was a material engineering student in college, so 3D Printing is at the joint of the two fields that I have worked in, material science and computer science. As Promac provides me the opportunity to contribute my skills in both areas, this internship is very suitable for me.

 

Q: What projects are you currently working on here at Promac?

We are working on a 3D model design for the Beverly Wilshire Hotel. The hotel is looking to provide this  miniature 3D Printed model for all their guests.

 

Q: What are your professional goals? How do you think this internship will help achieve your goals?

I aspire to be a full-stack engineer and ultimately the CTO of my very own company. This internship will boost my skills in computer science and material science, including web design and model design, and of course some hands-on experience in 3D Printing. Only when you know its current situation, you can see its future.

The people here are also kind and the environment is really friendly. My supervisors, James and Brett, are always ready to provide everything that we interns need to making things happen. Thank you all!

yuxuan
How To: Scan to Mobile

Want to scan documents and send them directly to your mobile device? 

Download Konica Minolta’s PageScope App! 

Click here for iPhone/iPad

Click here for Android

pagescope_ipad

 

How to Scan to Mobile:

  1. Connect to your Wi-Fi.
  2. Download the PageScope app on your mobile device (click link(s) above).
  3. Open app.
  4. Press “Select Printer” at the bottom of the app’s homepage to make sure the Konica Minolta printer you want to use is there. If you do not see your printer, press “Add Printer.” If you still do not see your printer, click “Manual” and enter the IP Address of your machine. To find your IP address, click “Utility/Counter” on the right of your machine’s INFO-Palette and then click “Device Information.” You should now see your machine’s IP address number. 
  5. After manually entering the IP number, click “Add.”
  6. Return to the app’s homepage and press “Scan.” You should see the Konica Minolta machine you want at the top. 
  7. Change scanner settings as you see fit and you are free to press “Scan.”
  8. You should now have your scanned document in your mobile device! You can now save the document in your phone, email, or open in your device’s other apps. 

How cool is that?! With this app you can scan your documents without having to turn on your computer. 

Supported Formats:

  • PDF, Compact PDF, XPS, Compact XPS, JPEG, TIFF, PPTX (XPS, Compact XPS, and PPTX scanned with a Konica Minolta MFP are not supported for display. Only direct printing is supported.)
  • Scanning size: automatic detection, A3 SEF, A4 SEF, A4 LEF, 8 1/2×14 SEF, 8 1/2×11 SEF, 8 1/2×11 LEF 

Recommended Resolution: 

  • 200 dpi

 

How To: Print From Mobile

Want to print directly from your mobile device?

Download Konica Minolta’s app PageScope!

Click here for Android

Click here for iPhone/iPad

pagescope

How to Print: 

  1. Connect to your Wi-Fi. 
  2. Download PageScope app in your mobile device (click links above).
  3. Open app.
  4. Press “Select Printer” to make sure the Konica Minolta printer you want to use is there. If you do not see your printer, press “Add Printer.” If you still do not see your printer, click “Manual” and enter the IP Address of your machine. To find your IP address, click “Utility/Counter” on the right of your machine’s INFO-Palette and then click “Device Information.” You should now see your machine’s IP address number. 
  5. After manually entering the IP number, click “Add.”
  6. Now you are free to print directly from your mobile device to your Konica Minolta machine within the app! AND with all sorts of options to meet all your needs. 

With the PageScope app, you can print everything in your “My Documents” folder in your app, email, web browser, camera, and photos in your mobile device. 

 

Supported Formats: 

  • JPEG, GIF, BMP, PNG
  • PDF 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7 (password-protected PDFs will require i-Option LK-102 on your MFP)
  • TIFF 6.0
  • XPS
  • DOCX, XLSX, PPTX (please refer to “Supported Models” for MFP models supporting these applications)

 

 

 

Meet Promac’s New 3D Interns! Part 2

Meet Fuyue! Fuyue is a first-year graduate student at USC studying Materials Engineering.

Q: Why are you interested in 3D Printing? Why did you want this internship? 

Fuyue (F): I have been interested in 3D Printing since I started learning about additive manufacturing in college. Especially when comparing 3D Printing to traditional manufacturing methods, this technology is capable of being more efficient for design and prototyping. Also, industries are not the only ones who can use this technology, but families can also use desktop 3D Printers and become their own toymakers or furniture suppliers. 

I chose this internship at Promac because it is closely related to the field I am interested in — mechanical engineering in product design and manufacturing. I also find that this internship will provide me with a lot of hands-on work, which is important for a mechanical engineer. Promac also provides the other interns and me a lot of resources, such as different 3D Printers, scanners, as well as design softwares. I am certain that this experience will help me develop a deeper understanding of this field as I am doing more than just learning from a website or papers. 

Q: What projects are you currently working on here at Promac?

F: I am currently designing a desktop cell phone holder for the sales team here at Promac. I am using a 3D design software called SOLIDWORKS and plan to print these holders using the CubePro Trio, as I know the end result will be lightweight and save costs on materials. 

Q: What are your professional goals? How do you think this internship will help achieve your goals?

F: I hope to become a professional mechanical engineer, specifically interested in the field of product design and manufacturing. This internship is a nice start for my career path since it is providing me the opportunity to learn within a real company and complete a project within a real work environment. 

Meet Promac’s New 3D Interns!

This spring, Promac welcomes 3 new interns to our 3D Printing team. As we will continue to share the different 3D projects we have been working on, we thought it would be a great idea to show who is behind these amazing prints.

 

First, we have Alan, a USC Viterbi School of Engineering graduate student studying Materials Engineering. 

Q: Why are you interested in 3D Printing? Why did you want this internship?

Alan (A): 3D Printing is definitely trending in the world today. I have also been interested in the 3D Printing industry for a long time now, as it gives people a new approach to create and manufacture their ideas on their own.

Even as a high school and undergraduate student, I have learned about 3D Printing in my lectures, but never thought I would get the chance to have hands-on experience with it. So this opportunity is one of the reasons why I wanted this internship. 

Q: What projects are you currently working on here at Promac? 

A: I am currently working on building items on SOLIDWORKS and 3DPrint, then using the ProJet 660 Pro to print. Some major advantages of 3D Printing is that it can easily produce sophisticated structures and save materials, especially when compared to more traditional methods. For example, I am currently building a trophy using 3DPrint software, which I know will save costs on materials when printed. By using a 3D Printer, I can produce the trophy in one print, eliminating the need for a traditional and extensive process, like plastics extrusion. 

Q: What are your professional goals? How do you think this internship will help achieve your goals? 

A: My goal is to work in the manufacturing industry as a materials process engineer, focusing on materials modification and multiple application. I look forward to applying what I am learning in school about manufacturing to 3D printing and seeing the different advantages that 3D printing has to offer. 

Alan_3Dintern
Check out our new YouTube channel!
posted by: in 3D Printing Projects

Promac has just created a new YouTube channel to share what we have been working on here in Los Angeles.

Our first set of videos showcases the exceptional projects our 3D Printing team has done with our 3D Systems 3D Printers. Click here to see our channel or check out our videos directly below. And make sure to like and subscribe! 🙂 

 

3D Systems CubePro 3D Trio Prints:

3D Systems ProJet 660Pro Prints:

3D Systems 3510 HD Prints:

 

 

Anomalisa, 3D Printing takes Oscar Nomination

 

Did you hear? Our very own 3D Systems ProJet x60 Series played a role in creating Oscar-nominated film Anomalisa!

3D Systems Projet x60 Series

3D Systems ProJet x60 Series used in Anomalisa

 

 

Directed by Charlie Kaufman (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Being John Malkovich) and produced by Starburns Industries, Anomalisa uses 3D printing technology for its award-winning stop-motion animation. The film 3D printed 1,261 faces for its puppet collection as the producers sought realism (despite the film being completely animated). Caroline Kastelic, the puppet supervisor, explained how the film used 3D printing since it provided the “realism that they wanted in the faces, and the textures and the differences in color would not have been possible by hand-painting.”

Kastelic further notes that 3D printing “saved [them] a lot of time,” showing why the producers decided to pursue 3D printing for the film. The process in creating the characters’ bodies, for example, demonstrates this as they were first hand-sculpted and then 3D printed for larger and quicker production. The 3D prints were then cast in silicone, all hand-seamed and then painted after that. Many of the puppets were also cast in a special foam mold with clay walls to ensure flexibility throughout the filming process. 

Anomalisa illustrates the versatility of 3D printing technology and its rising role in Hollywood. Call us today at (213) 386-7728 to experience the different and incredibles uses of 3D Printing technology for yourself! 

Source: https://all3dp.com/anomalisa-oscar-contender-uses-150-3d-printed-puppets/

Konica Minolta BizHub Wins BLI Winter 2016 Pick Award (twice!)

 

We have some exciting news here at Promac. The Konica Minolta bizhub C368 has won the Buyers Lab (BLI) Winter 2016 Pick Award for Outstanding 31- to 40-ppm A3 Color MFP! The KM bizhub C368 was recognized for its

  • Excellent reliabilityBLI2016
  • Fully customizable drive and diverse control panel
  • Accurate and Productive Scanning
  • High quality output in black and consistent color over long runs
  • Support for mobile printing
  • Comprehensive security measures

               

BLI Editor George Mikolay has provided positive comments about the machine, stating that “the Konica Minolta bizhub C368 was an excellent overall performer.” BLI Manager of Lab Operations Joe Ellerman further praises the bizhub C368, explaining that with the “device’s fast scan speeds and above average productivity…along with fast first-print times from daytime sleep and energy save, you have a device that will have no problem meeting the demands of busy office environments.”

And to top off this great news, the Konica Minolta bizhub 287 has also won the BLI Winter 2016 Pick Award for Outstanding 21- to 30-ppm A3 Monochrome MFP! Similar to the KM bizhub C368, the KM bizhub 287 has been recognized for its: flawless reliability, fully customizable driver and diver control panel, high quality print output, support for mobile printing, comprehensive security measures, and robust feature set.

Konica Minolta bizhub’s recent wins continue to show why our machines are the best in the industry. Call us today at (213) 386-7728 to experience the excellence of Konica Minolta bizhub!

KM c368

The Smallest 3D Benchy
posted by: in Uncategorized

As a way to test the limits of our Projet 3510 HD Plus, we decided to start a friendly competition with Junction 3D to see who could print the smallest 3D Benchy, a benchmark design. 3D Benchy is a widely used design that pushes the limit of any 3D printer. It commonly used to improve calibrations on FDM printers.

Junction 3D utilizes the Solus 3D Printer which is a DLP printer that prints using a photosensitive resin. They are able to achieve a layer resolution of 5 microns which is about 1/20th the width of a piece of hair!

Our Projet 3510 HD Plus is capable of printing a layer heights of 16 microns, but for our challenge, we have been using the 32 micron setting.

We first started off by printed a full scale Benchy which measures 60mm in length.

IMG_1155

Full Scale 3D Benchy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We then tried smaller scale 3D Benchy’s with the smallest one being only 1/5th scale (12mm Length)

IMG_1151benchycomp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Junction 3D responded with a couple of their own Benchy’s from their Solus printer that measured only 6.5mm in length!

Here’s the image.

In an attempt to win this challenge, we gave a shot at printing a 1/10th scale Benchy that would only measure 6mm in length, and here is the result:

KICX1860

1/10th Scale 3D Benchy

We were a bit worried that the post processing of the print would ruin the design because the walls holding up the roof are fairly thin, but the print held up through the high temperatures. We are currently waiting for another response from Junction 3D, but as of now, we currently hold the record for the smallest 3D Benchy! We also plan on printing a smaller one with a higher resolution in the near future so stay tuned!

If you think you could do better than us and want to join our challenge, please feel free to comment below!

3D Printed Cathedral
posted by: in Uncategorized

new3 new1 new2

At Promac, we’ve been running our Projet 3510 HD Plus to see how small it could print while retaining important details and features. The 35X0 is an acrylic based printer that utilizes UV curing to harden the material. While some models can print up to 32 Micron layers (HD Mode), others can print up to 16 Micron layers (XHD). In the XHD Mode, not only are the Z-axis steps decreased, the X and Y resolution is also doubled, creating small feature details as small as 0.05mm.

Another model we tested out was the singe print version of the Gothic Cathedral Play Set available on Thingiverse. The model was originally a model split into many different pieces to ensure print quality, especially for FDM machines. The single print can also be printed with FDM machines without any supports! Both the multi-piece and single-piece models have been a popular for its intricate design in architecture.  

Print Information

Model: Gothic Cathedral Single Print

Model Source: Thingiverse

Printer: 3D Systems Projet 3510 HD Plus

Part Material: Visijet Crystal M3

Support Material: Visijet S300

Print Duration: ~10 Hours

Z resolution: 29 Microns

X – Y resolution: ~33 Microns

 

The printed model was 55mm in length and about 40mm in height. The most impressive feature of the print were the windows. Some of the windows measured only 1mm wide, yet they were still very clearly visible. Another part of the print that impressed us were the towers. Despite their thin appearance, they’re actually quite tough; we assumed they would be brittle, but later found them to be strong enough to pierce the cardboard boxes we used to put them in and even human skin. 

We have many more prints coming from our 3510 as well as our 660 and CubePro! Please stay tuned for more of our 3D printing projects!

 

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